Insomnia disorder

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Overview

Insomnia disorder is characterised by dissatisfaction with the quality or quantity of sleep, which leads to significant impairments in functioning.1 Commonly cited complaints include trouble getting to sleep, staying asleep, or unrefreshing sleep. The seriousness of insomnia is increasingly being recognised by clinicians due to the significant consequences of sleep disturbance, and also its high level of comorbidity with many medical and psychiatric disorders.2

Assessment should be informed by an understanding of the predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factors that are thought to be involved in the development and maintenance of insomnia disorder.3 Assessment involves taking a comprehensive sleep history and thorough medical, substance, and psychiatric history, as well as evaluation of any co-existing physical or mental disorders.3

Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the most commonly used and supported non-pharmacological treatment for insomnia disorder.4-6 CBT-I targets the unhelpful behaviours, thoughts, and beliefs that serve as perpetuating factors for the sleep problems.7 Treatment for insomnia disorder primarily aims to improve the quality and quantity of sleep, in order to improve the individual’s wellbeing.3

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  • Contributor(s)
    APS Member Resources Team

    Dr Moira Junge
    Health Psychologist
    Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre

  • Publish date
    12 Feb 2015
  • References
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